Anatomy of a Tie-In Fundraising Opportunity (and Tribute Event)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_people_from_Connecticut

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackie_Robinson

http://www.chockfullonuts.com/#  (Mr. Robinson is prominently featured in this great video in the History tab)

http://www.shrm.org/Pages/default.aspx

http://www.soctshrm.org/

When a local corporation does not have an office dedicated to corporate contributions, who is the go-to person? Human Resources? Even when there are full-time communications people dedicated to giving, HR is always at the giving table because corporate philanthropy is first and foremost about employee morale.

A perfect Tie-In opportunity is always with a professional association. What better profession than HR? This association has seven chapters in CT. Southern CT’s http://www.soctshrm.org/ big annual event http://www.soctshrm.org/mc/page.do?sitePageId=69935&orgId=sccs, attended by nearly 300 people representing all major companies throughout Fairfield County, needs a charity Tie-In.

Here’s one idea to enhance this already organized, paid for, and stressed over event for October 2010: Honoring former Stamford resident Jackie Robinson’s legacy. From 1957 to 1964, Mr. Robinson served as the vice president for personnel at one of the nation’s oldest companies, Chock Full O’Nuts, and as such he was the first black person to serve as vice president of a major American corporation, let alone in an HR capacity.

Jackie Robinson retired to Stamford in 1957 where the Jackie Robinson Park of Fame stands today at 860 Canal Street. His wife, Rachel Robinson, pursued a career in academic nursing and became an assistant professor at the Yale School of Nursing and director of nursing at the Connecticut Mental Health Center. On October 24, 1972, Mr. Robinson died of a heart attack at his home, aged fifty-three. According to a poll conducted in 1947, Mr. Robinson was the second most popular man in the country, behind Bing Crosby. In 1999, he was named by Time magazine on its list of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century.

In 1970, Mr. Robinson established the Jackie Robinson Construction Company to build housing for low-income families. Might this be a CT cause to benefit from such a Tie-In?  Might the nursing community be a cause in honor of Mrs. Robinson career? If your charity (whatever your cause, especially if you serve disadvantaged children) presents the idea to the Society of Human Resource Management and can also enlist the support of the Robinson family and/or local MLB celebs — http://www.mlb.com/index.jsp — all the more reason this annual event should enthusiastically embrace your cause for the enjoyment and pride of association of its members.

The Robinson Park in Pasadena, CA was just reopened last week, dedicating its expansion not only to the man who integrated Major League Baseball, but to his entire family. Delano Robinson, sister-in-law of the great baseball Hall-of-Famer, threw out the first pitch for an exhibition softball game to mark the re-launch of the park. It was Delano Robinson’s husband, Mack, who won the silver medal in the 1936 Olympics, finishing less than a second behind Jesse Owens in the 200-meter dash. The Robinson legacy lives on.

The attached Wikipedia list of famous CT people does not even include Jackie Robinson. As with all posts at causeCT, this post is merely an example of what is possible for your cause. Whether on or off the Wiki list of famous CT people living or passed away, there are any number of Tribute opportunities, Tie-In opportunities, cause marketing opportunities for your cause to capture for the benefit of your beneficiaries. The money for your cause is there, but you will not find it in a grants database or by reading about it in the daily news. You need to create the opportunities for giving to your worthy cause.

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